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Structural Insights into Saccharomyces cerevisiae Msh4-Msh5 Complex Function Using Homology Modeling

Abstract

The Msh4-Msh5 protein complex in eukaryotes is involved in stabilizing Holliday junctions and its progenitors to facilitate crossing over during Meiosis I. These functions of the Msh4-Msh5 complex are essential for proper chromosomal segregation during the first meiotic division. The Msh4/5 proteins are homologous to the bacterial mismatch repair protein MutS and other MutS homologs (Msh2, Msh3, Msh6). Saccharomyces cerevisiae msh4/5 point mutants were identified recently that show two fold reduction in crossing over, compared to wild-type without affecting chromosome segregation. Three distinct classes of msh4/5 point mutations could be sorted based on their meiotic phenotypes. These include msh4/5 mutations that have a) crossover and viability defects similar to msh4/5 null mutants; b) intermediate defects in crossing over and viability and c) defects only in crossing over. The absence of a crystal structure for the Msh4-Msh5 complex has hindered an understanding of the structural aspects of Msh4-Msh5 function as well as molecular explanation for the meiotic defects observed in msh4/5 mutations. To address this problem, we generated a structural model of the S. cerevisiae Msh4-Msh5 complex using homology modeling. Further, structural analysis tailored with evolutionary information is used to predict sites with potentially critical roles in Msh4-Msh5 complex formation, DNA binding and to explain asymmetry within the Msh4-Msh5 complex. We also provide a structural rationale for the meiotic defects observed in the msh4/5 point mutations. The mutations are likely to affect stability of the Msh4/5 proteins and/or interactions with DNA. The Msh4-Msh5 model will facilitate the design and interpretation of new mutational data as well as structural studies of this important complex involved in meiotic chromosome segregation.

Content

Authors :Rakshambikai R, Srinivasan N, Nishant KT.
Year :2013
School :Biology
Genre :Jurnal Article
Journal :PLOS ONE
Volume :8
Pages :e78753
DOI :http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0078753
ARXIV :http://arxiv.org/abs/